Interesting Facts about Ink

  • By Stephen Taylor
  • 12 Oct, 2017
permanent ink isn't really permanent

Thanks to significant technological advancements over the past century, especially the last few decades, we can document our stories and record history as it happens, but that wasn't always the case. Ink was the sole form of communication for previous generations up until inventions such as the camera, and it still has a well-cemented place in today's society.

At Centre Colours, we supply the ink, paint and coating industries with high-quality pigment dispersions, bespoke blend scheme inks and performance inks. Thanks to having a manufacturing facility with the most technologically advanced equipment near Sherburn in Elmet, we're the go-to provider for businesses in Leeds, Bradford and West Yorkshire.

Naturally, given our place in the market, we take an interest in strange and fascinating facts about ink, its applications and its history. Below, we share five of the most surprising ink facts that you won’t believe at the first time of reading.

1.       The Origins of Ink Date Back to the Bronze Age

There are actually different theories regarding when humans first manufactured and used ink, but we can all agree that it happened thousands of years ago. One historian named BN Goswamy believes that a philosopher called Tien-Lcheu invented ink during the Bronze Age in the year 2697 BC. That means that we've been using ink almost continuously for over 4,500 years.

2.       Permanent Ink Isn't Really Permanent

Regardless of when ink was invented, people have always been searching for ways to ensure their paintings and messages could be seen by future generations for millennia to come, and modern inventions like permanent markers demonstrate this way of thinking in modern humans. However, an eco-friendly and non-toxic lanolin-based cream will remove most types of permanent ink easily.

3.       Squid Ink Can Help Fight Cancer

Thanks to a relatively recent discovery, we can use squid ink for more than just pasta and risotto dishes. Researchers have found that squid ink has antioxidant properties that boost your immunity. Perhaps more impressively, squid ink enhances the production of white blood cells and stops blood vessels growing in tumours to fight cancer.

4.       Ancient Civilisations Made Ink from People

In many ancient cultures, making ink from the burnt bones and ashes of the deceased was far from uncommon. Of course, such a practice is infrequent nowadays, though Mark Gruenwald, a long-time Marvel employee, had some of his ashes mixed with ink and inserted in an issue of Squadron Supreme after passing away following a heart attack in 1996.

5.       Some People Make Ink from Their Own Blood

Despite being painful to extract as well as being a low-quality ink, many people use blood to make their mark. Saddam Hussein was thought to have had a Koran inscribed with his blood, and modern artists such as Jordan Eagles and Vincent Castiglia use blood as their paint.

As it turns out, ink is an integral part of human evolution, and it still shapes the way in which many people operate today. If you're a business in the paint, ink or coating industry and want to learn more about modern technologies such as pigment dispersions and litho concentrates, contact us today on 01977 685 458, or speak to one of our professionals at Bypass Park Estate, Leeds, LS25 6EP.

By Stephen Taylor 14 Nov, 2017

Take a look in any direction, and you can probably see some ink, whether it's a poster on your wall depicting your favourite superstars or a logo printed onto food packaging. If you work in the ink, paint or coating industries, ink most likely defines your life and livelihood, but some people have decided to use ink to set some amazing world records.

Here at Centre Colours, we serve the industries mentioned above with the most advanced ink solutions available, from pigment dispersions to bespoke blend scheme inks. Even though we're based in Leeds, we've become the go-to ink provider to many businesses across the UK and further afield to international markets.

Thanks to our state-of-the-art facilities, we can supply off-the-shelf solutions or manufacture tailored products to your exact specifications. However, just because we’re a B2B provider doesn't mean we're only business-oriented when it comes to ink and the fascinating stories behind its past, present and future, which is why we've detailed some Guinness World Records below that couldn't have been set without the use of ink.

The Most Amazing World Records Related to Ink

In no particular order, here are what we think are some of the most astonishing world records that wouldn't exist without ink:

·         The World's Most Tattooed Man

Ever wondered how much of the human body could be covered in tattoos? The answer is 100 percent of it, and we know this because Lucky Rich, an Australian tattoo enthusiast and all-around daredevil, set the world record for "most tattooed man" in 2015 after having his entire body covered in ink.

·         Largest Ballpoint Pen

It may not be the most practical drawing instrument, but the largest ballpoint pen in the world is 5.5m long, and it was made by the world record holder, Acharya Makunuri Srinivasa, in 2011. The pen transfers real ink to paper, but because of its immense size, you'd need a group of at least four people to use it. Nevertheless, at 37.23kg, this pen currently holds the record for being the biggest in the world.

·         Longest Lino Print

In 2015, The UK's Anna Wilkinson, with help from Northern Print, made a lino print that measured 33.51m in length. A team of rugby players pushed a scrum machine to transfer the ink to the very long sheet of paper.

·         Longest Drawing by an Individual

Parimalakanth Kumaravijayan, drew a picture that was 660.22m in length back in 2016 in India, making it the longest drawing in the world. The drawing's theme was sea life, and the pictures depicted various marine animals.

Do You Need Ink for a Commercial Purpose?

While we don't supply the ink required to create the world's longest lino print or cover a person from head to toe in tattoos, we do provide graphene inks, bespoke blend scheme inks, barrier inks, and pigment dispersions to the ink, paint and coating industries. Contact us today on 01977 685 458 to learn more about our products or place an order, and one of our knowledgeable professionals, located at Bypass Park Estate, Leeds, LS25 6EP, will be happy to provide further details.

By Stephen Taylor 14 Nov, 2017

Nowadays, we see ink used for various purposes virtually constantly, whether it's a billboard advertising a company's latest products or a signpost detailing an upcoming hazard. However, historically, ink was used for some bizarre reasons, from poets instructing wives how to be unfaithful to their husbands to secret letters written by prisoners trying to overthrow their rulers.

Here at Centre Colours, we provide advanced ink solutions to the paint and coating industries in Leeds and the UK, and some of our most advanced products include pigment dispersions, bespoke blend scheme inks and litho concentrates. We have a broad range of off-the-shelf solutions available, or we can develop a bespoke product to your particular specifications.

Naturally, given our position in the industry, we have a vested interest in the extensive selection of uses for ink, both historically and in the modern world, and we're confident that you probably don't know some of the interesting – and somewhat strange – facts that we've detailed below.

Lesser Known Facts about Ink

Here’s our countdown of what we feel are some of the most peculiar historical uses for ink, starting with a story about a not so romantic Roman poet:

1.       Ovid's Advice

Ovid was a Roman poet who had a reputation for being a ladies' man, but the women he had affairs with were often already married. Ovid decided to help his lovers hide their secret from their husbands by teaching them how to write messages that would never be unearthed by those who didn't know what to look for. He instructed his already married lovers to use fresh milk to write secret messages that could then be read by adding powdered charcoal.

2.       Mary's Downfall

Mary, the Queen of Scots, was placed under house arrest for 18 years by Queen Elizabeth I, but that didn't stop her from attempting to break free of her shackles by organising a coup. Mary often used alum – hydrated potassium aluminium sulphate – to write messages that could only be seen by dipping the paper in water. The letters were purposed to encourage Catholic supporters to rebel against Elizabeth, but her plot was foiled when Lord Washington, Elizabeth's spymaster, set up a trap to catch her.

3.       Explosive Ink

Thanks to the growing interest in popular science during the 18th century, France and England set about making invisible ink into a form of entertainment. Unfortunately for Jean-Jacques Rousseau, experimenting with a sympathetic ink containing arsenic sulphide led to an explosion that almost killed him.

4.       The Lemon Juice Spies

During WWI, German spies operating in England used citrus as ink to try and hide their communications. Unfortunately for the spies, the British realised what was going on and caught several of the spies with lemons on their person. They were executed in the Tower of London in 1915.

Want to Know More about the Most Modern Ink Applications?

At Centre Colours, we find the historical uses for ink fascinating, but not nearly as interesting as the plethora of uses we have for ink today. If you'd like to learn more about the applications for conductive inks, graphene inks or pigment dispersions, or if you'd like to place an order, don't hesitate to contact us on 01977 685 458. One of our friendly professionals, located at Bypass Park Estate, Leeds, LS25 6EP, will be delighted to take your call.

By Stephen Taylor 12 Oct, 2017

Thanks to significant technological advancements over the past century, especially the last few decades, we can document our stories and record history as it happens, but that wasn't always the case. Ink was the sole form of communication for previous generations up until inventions such as the camera, and it still has a well-cemented place in today's society.

At Centre Colours, we supply the ink, paint and coating industries with high-quality pigment dispersions, bespoke blend scheme inks and performance inks. Thanks to having a manufacturing facility with the most technologically advanced equipment near Sherburn in Elmet, we're the go-to provider for businesses in Leeds, Bradford and West Yorkshire.

Naturally, given our place in the market, we take an interest in strange and fascinating facts about ink, its applications and its history. Below, we share five of the most surprising ink facts that you won’t believe at the first time of reading.

1.       The Origins of Ink Date Back to the Bronze Age

There are actually different theories regarding when humans first manufactured and used ink, but we can all agree that it happened thousands of years ago. One historian named BN Goswamy believes that a philosopher called Tien-Lcheu invented ink during the Bronze Age in the year 2697 BC. That means that we've been using ink almost continuously for over 4,500 years.

2.       Permanent Ink Isn't Really Permanent

Regardless of when ink was invented, people have always been searching for ways to ensure their paintings and messages could be seen by future generations for millennia to come, and modern inventions like permanent markers demonstrate this way of thinking in modern humans. However, an eco-friendly and non-toxic lanolin-based cream will remove most types of permanent ink easily.

3.       Squid Ink Can Help Fight Cancer

Thanks to a relatively recent discovery, we can use squid ink for more than just pasta and risotto dishes. Researchers have found that squid ink has antioxidant properties that boost your immunity. Perhaps more impressively, squid ink enhances the production of white blood cells and stops blood vessels growing in tumours to fight cancer.

4.       Ancient Civilisations Made Ink from People

In many ancient cultures, making ink from the burnt bones and ashes of the deceased was far from uncommon. Of course, such a practice is infrequent nowadays, though Mark Gruenwald, a long-time Marvel employee, had some of his ashes mixed with ink and inserted in an issue of Squadron Supreme after passing away following a heart attack in 1996.

5.       Some People Make Ink from Their Own Blood

Despite being painful to extract as well as being a low-quality ink, many people use blood to make their mark. Saddam Hussein was thought to have had a Koran inscribed with his blood, and modern artists such as Jordan Eagles and Vincent Castiglia use blood as their paint.

As it turns out, ink is an integral part of human evolution, and it still shapes the way in which many people operate today. If you're a business in the paint, ink or coating industry and want to learn more about modern technologies such as pigment dispersions and litho concentrates, contact us today on 01977 685 458, or speak to one of our professionals at Bypass Park Estate, Leeds, LS25 6EP.

By Stephen Taylor 12 Oct, 2017

Commercial paint manufacturers use pigment dispersions to create paints in a huge variety of hues, which are then used by homeowners across the globe to personalize houses and apartments. In order to appeal to their target audience, manufacturers need to ensure that their paints perform as required. Good quality paint can only be made with good quality dispersions and there are two key performance metrics that DIY enthusiasts and trade customers alike are concerned with when choosing what paints to coat their property walls with, both of which depend on the quality of the pigment dispersions used to make them:

 

  • Productivity – A more productive paint is one that covers a greater area for a given amount of liquid and the easiest way to ensure good productivity is to use pigment dispersions with an excellent concentration of pigment in the base grind. Such dispersions can be used to create paints which, when diluted to achieve lighter tones and shades, retain their ability to cover a large surface area with a relatively small amount of liquid. Because the all-important pigments are evenly distributed throughout such paints, they are very easy to work with and it takes less coats to produce a uniform finish. All these qualities ensure greater productivity, which, of course, means lower costs for end users, without the need to make compromises as far as quality is concerned.

 

  • Colour Strength – A good quality paint must exhibit stable colour strength when applied to different surfaces. This goal can most easily be achieved by using pigment dispersions that employ dispersants known for their ability to control the attraction and repulsion forces between individual pigment particles. Using pigment particles of the right size can help enormously in achieving this goal but it can only really be guaranteed by using the best dispersants for the job. Quality dispersants maintain a delicate balance of attraction and repulsion between the pigment particles: a balance that makes it possible to achieve good viscosity and strength of colour in paints of all types. Paints that exhibit these desirable characteristics are in great demand as they enable painters and decorators to accurately translate the visions of interior designers, and delight their clients in the process.

 

As well as enabling manufacturers to produce paints that meet end users’ expectations, quality pigment dispersions make the task of mixing different shades and tones much simpler than it would otherwise be. Paints with evenly dispersed pigments that are also very stable tend to react with other paints in a predictable manner, allowing mixing specialists to create a wide variety of custom hues very easily. Given the high expectations of both domestic and trade customers in the 21st century, it is important for paint suppliers to be able to create custom blends quickly and accurately so it is not difficult to understand why they too are very keen on paints made with quality pigment dispersions .

 

 

To discuss pigment dispersions for paints, bespoke blend scheme inks , graphene inks , conductive inks or any other applications, please contact us by phone during business hours or by email whenever you wish.

By Stephen Taylor 12 Oct, 2017

At Centre Colours, our primary aim is to produce pigment dispersions of the highest quality, in order to satisfy the needs of our customers in the printing ink, paint and coatings industries. We believe that manufacturing our products in an environmentally responsible manner helps us to maintain our high standards and that an effective environmental management system is key to our future success: while some manufacturers may see such systems as a necessary evil in a world where ecological concerns often take centre stage, we see our system as an integral part of our manufacturing policy and something that will ensure our products remain relevant for many years to come. For all of these reasons, ISO 14001 accreditation is very important to us.

 What Exactly is ISO 14001?

 ISO 14001 is a standard designed to assist organizations that wish to implement an environmental management system and to recognize the efforts of those that succeed in this aim. It sets out guidelines for the creation of environmental goals that an organization can achieve and areas in which it can make changes for the better. Whilst it does not stipulate specific targets with regard to emissions, pollution or the use of recyclable materials, it does require accredited companies to publicly declare the environmental measures they are taking or to seek confirmation/certification of their measures and goals by a third party.

 

Why We Feel ISO 14001 Is Important

 

We are proud to have received our ISO 14001 certification, in recognition of our environmental management system, and there are several key reasons that we believe ISO 14001 is an important standard.

 

  • The Future of Mankind – We believe it is important for all commercial organizations to focus on their environmental responsibilities in the here and now because there is no time left to waste. If we are to leave future generations with a habitable planet that remains a beautiful place to live, we need to take action today.

 

  • Sustainability – Putting concerns for the future of our planet to one side for the moment, we feel it is important to develop sustainable manufacturing processes for our pigment dispersions in Leeds simply because if we do not, one day we may not have access to the raw materials we need to create the high-quality products on which our customers rely. We want our customers to be able to make the best performance inks , litho concentrates and coloured coatings for many years to come, using the environmentally responsible products that we have worked so hard to create.

 

  • Our Customers’ Environmental Policies – The vast majority of our clients have their own environmental management policies, which they need to follow in order to achieve their own ecological goals. If we, as their supplier, set high standards in this area, we make this task a little easier.

 

Whether you are interested in our standard pigment dispersions or bespoke products, we know you will be happy to learn that we take our environmental responsibilities seriously. If you have any questions about our policies, please feel free to call or email us whenever convenient.

By Stephen Taylor 12 Oct, 2017

Humans have been using ink to write stories, record history and create works of art for thousands of years, and it's only been possible to do those things thanks to the invention of ink. Plus, even in our modern, technologically advanced world, ink still plays a vital role, and the ink industry is still growing.

At Centre Colours, we find the history of ink fascinating because, without ink, we wouldn't be where we are today. We supply the paint, ink and coating industries with high-quality ink products, such as bespoke blend scheme inks and pigment dispersions, at high-value wholesale prices.

If you're a business in need of ink, we're the company to call, and we can deliver to any location in West Yorkshire with ease thanks to being located on the Bypass Park Estate in Sherburn in Elmet. Below, we've detailed some of the most significant dates and events in the history of ink so that you can see why we think our industry is so fascinating.

·         2500 BC

The precise origins of ink are widely disputed, but most people agree that ancient Chinese and Egyptian civilisations started developing ink from carbon particles around 2500 BC. That means that humans have been using ink almost continuously for over 4,000 years, and our dependency on ink is far from waning today.

·         4th Century BC

Over 2,400 years ago, India Ink started to increase in popularity in China. India Ink was made from pitch, tar and burnt bones and was transferred to something like paper using a sharp pointed needle.

·         First Centuries BC

Egypt helped make the papyrus scroll popular, which is made from the pith of a papyrus plant. The Egyptians were one of the earliest civilisations to document and record history using scribes and ink.

·         6th Century AD

In Europe, the quill pen started to boom in popularity around the 6th century AD, and it would remain the most commonly used writing utensil until the 19th century. The quill pen served as the inspiration for most of the modern ink pens you find in stores today.

·         1856 AD

William Henry Perkin, an English chemist, discovered synthetic dyes while searching for a cure for malaria, and said dyes would later become the basis of dyeing ink.

·         Today

Over the past 100 years, we've developed the likes of inkjet printers, the CMYK process, and advanced ink formulas and solutions such as pigment dispersions, performance inks and bespoke blend scheme inks. If you're a business that needs help finding the right ink products, we're the company to call.

Here at Centre Colours, we're the go-to ink provider for businesses in Leeds, Bradford and across West Yorkshire, although we have a vast network of satisfied clients across the UK. We go above and beyond the call of duty to exceed client expectations, and while we're interested in the history of ink, we're more focused on ensuring our products are future-proof. Contact us today on 01977 685 458 to learn more about our advanced ink products, or come and see us in person at Bypass Park Estate, Leeds, LS25 6EP

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